$4.3 Million Homes in California

A French Caribbean-inspired home in Newport Beach, a 1923 Spanish-style house in Beverly Hills and an estate with its own olive grove in Carmel Valley.

Comments: 17

  1. I'm sorry, but at a time when tens of thousands of people all over this country are wondering when they'll see another paycheck because their place of employment has shut down because of COVID-19, it seems pretty out of touch to highlight what 4.3 million in California real estate looks like. Exhibit A of what's wrong in America.

  2. @Jen Grotesque, isn’t it?

  3. @Jen And you're in the real estate section because...you're looking for a new house?

  4. @Jen The "What You Get" articles are always a bit tacky, but I don't see why they are any tackier now than in pre-pandemic times. The Times is full of articles on COVID-19; it's easy enough not to click on one purporting to tell you what you get for $4.3 million in California.

  5. If you've got that much money to spend move to Ensenada (about an hour south of San Diego) and build a better house for 20% of the cost, right on the ocean, and retire in luxury. $50,000 a year in taxes? Absurd.

  6. My heart goes out to the 1% who are truly suffering during this difficult period. Despite a generous income tax cut for them I fear they may need and deserve some property tax relief.

  7. So ... $4.3 million buys you gold wallpaper. On the ceiling .... Tacky houses and a tasteless article.

  8. I encourage you to do a slideshow revealing what $500 a month buys you on the southside of Chicago sometime soon. We get it ... the rich live like royalty. Please use your power as journalists to highlight the inequality we face. Jacob Riis is rolling over in his grave.

  9. Why is the Times telling us about multi-million dollar homes in California? There has been a series of these for some time now. Does the Times editorial staff think most of us readers have any real interest in this and have the means to be other than voyeurs from the other than 1% on the outside looking in? It just seems ill advised. The same goes with the multi-million dollar penthouses advertised in the Sunday Magazine. In these days when many of your readers are fearful of being able to pay for their rent and basic food these features strike me as obscene.

  10. If it ‘s any consolation, these houses would sell for one half to one quarter anywhere else in the country.(with the exception of mid town, Brooklyn and SF).

  11. This article, on which you expended resources to prepare and ready it for publication, in a time of national crisis and a growing national dialogue on economic injustice and income equality, is very disturbing. Your editorial staff has become very out of touch with the reality of most Americans. Realtors marketing to the 1% do not need the New York Times to be their marketing arm. I hope you take responsibility for this and explain how this happened to your subscribers, because many of them, like me, did not sign up for this.

  12. I live in SF and like you pay the price for doing so and I like the article. When I look for social editorializing I rarely turn to real estate section. The NYT does seem to devote a large portion of its online and print media to the social sciences.(see opinions, politics, front page etc.)

  13. @DN You are most definitely opining on a singular point of view. I thoroughly enjoy looking at these houses and am very pleased that the NYT continues to include them each week.

  14. You're right, NYT, America desperately needs a serious wealth tax and the elimination of all tax loopholes. Ostentatious displays of wealth like this are really disgusting when most people are just trying to keep their heads above water. Vote progressive and put an end to this appalling displays of wealth!

  15. Horf. (And I'm a Californian.)

  16. Apropos of not much, I find it interesting, the distinction in how to say CARMEL depending on geography. In north central coastal CA, the town is CarMEL. Here in San Diego County, the inland suburb of the same name is called “CARmul”.

  17. Amazing how those who hate articles on expensive houses come to the NYT to read articles about expensive houses . . . and then complain about it. Maybe if y'all would stop reading these articles the NYT would stop publishing them. But health crisis or no, a lot of people like to escape to a little house porn.