Looking for Frederick Douglass in Savannah

Savannah, Ga., is a pilgrimage destination for those interested in the abolitionist’s life, with artists interpreting his legacy in riveting shows and a film.


Comments: 8

  1. Savannah is a national treasure. We love everything Savannah. It's magical.

  2. He and Lincoln, two of the greatest leaders in our history. Both were both mentors and students of each other. Lincoln taught Douglass how to soften his radical views re the immediate abolition of slavery and Douglass lit a fire under Lincoln to eventually end it. Both gave the ultimate compliment to each other. After Lincoln sacred 2nd inag. speech stating the price we had to pay for slavery, Lincoln summoned Douglass to the WH. When they met Douglass asked why would somebody want my opinion, a black be of any interest to anybody. Lincoln said on the contrary his opinion was the most important to him. Douglass replied to Lincoln re the speech, a sacred effort Mr. President. Douglass said Lincoln was one of the few if not the only white man who treated him like an equal. We can learn from them today ie good people on the left and right joining forces to solve problems.

  3. The painting in the background of the photo "Estate of Norman Lewis; via Michael Rosenfeld Gallery; Dylan Wilson for The New York Times". Does anyone know the artist or the name of the painting? It's the lady sitting with what looks like a Bible in her hands.

  4. @Dave "The Reader" by William H. Johnson.

  5. @MS Thank you very much

  6. For a good intro into Frederick Douglass, may I suggest the BBC In Our Time podcast episode on him. I never knew how much I missed in elementary school history until I listened to that. What a phenomenal person he was.

  7. Is a photo of Walter Allen mislabeled "Estate of Norman Lewis"?

  8. Again thanks to the NYT for an article that gives me so many reasons to want to learn more about Frederick Douglass and his place in our history.